Dennis: Feeding the Soul: Healthy Minds and Bodies Program Update

Why Feeding the Soul: Healthy Minds and Bodies Program?
This fun program is what I have been working on for the last while. We came up with this amazing title because we wanted to say, in a few words, what the program was going to be about. We wanted something creative that would make youth want to be part of this great program. We know that having a healthy body and a healthy mind is not only about eating healthy foods and being happy, it is actually doing what you truly like and enjoy the most. It makes you feel satisfied and that satisfaction will make you want to achieve your higher goals. Feeding your soul is loving yourself first, feeling at peace with your neighbours, and embracing the world the way it is.

What is it about?
The Feeding the Soul: Healthy Minds and Bodies Program has been about discovering hidden skills and learning new ways to be engaged with the community. The program had positive topics that helped the participants be more confident, gain new skills, be more creative, and learn how to boost their self-esteem. We explored very efficient techniques to help de-stress,  gain confidence, improve public speaking skills, and skills for youth to be able to introduce themselves to someone new in school or the community.

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Gwen’s Speak Up! workshop

What activities took place?
We started our first week introducing ourselves, making anti-stress balloons, watching some videos from TransLink, cooking, making some oil pastel paintings, and sharing our thoughts, ideas and opinions about certain topics. We had a special guest that guided our participants in some activities on how to network and present themselves. We also had several craft activities and we gave some prizes and certificate for participating in our youth program.

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Valentine’s Day card activity with Jeniffer Espinal

Being able to help the community by supporting Canadians is something that has impacted my life in a very positive way. Now I understand that children and youth face different and difficult challenges in life too, even though adults sometimes think their own children do not have problems or situations that make them feel stressed, sad, depressed or without energy. Part of the problem is poor communication with their family members which can be improved by doing activities together, going on family trips, doing activities to meet new friends and doing what they really like.

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Doing kitchen activities with the participants was a really good experience for all of us because our Kitchen Coordinator, Kendall, gave our participants really important facts on nutrition. Nutrition can have a big impact on well being. She also gave step-by-step instructions, in one of our sessions, on how to make a cauliflower pizza which was really amazing, tasty and healthy!

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Our next Feeding the Soul: Healthy Minds and Bodies Program has already started and we will be offering more session in the future. Contact us if you would like to participate! Here is what it is all about:
The Feeding the Soul: Healthy Minds and Bodies Program will target youth up to age 24 in the Surrey area with a particular focus on those that are newcomers, refugees and citizens. We will cover interesting topics that will help them cope in school, work, at home, or in the community. We will also have a very experienced guests that will help build on communicating better and gain some important skills. As part of the program we will be doing some exciting activities plus everyone will learn how to make easy, fun and healthy snacks in each session and take home a recipe book!

When is it?
I will be facilitating the group on Saturdays from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM. Right now we are working with youth 15-18 and in March it will be youth 19-24. Call the number on the poster if you want to attend any of our sessions! Or, just email me at dflores@dcrs.ca

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Dennis: My First Month at DIVERSEcity

I started working at DIVERSEcity at the perfect time, because we are having lots of Christmas activities! There are lots of activities to be involved in, for example, we Christmas party in which everyone was cheery and dressed up in nice and colourful coats, Christmas sweaters and Santa’s hats. ,There are seminars going on, staff gatherings, gift exchange activities & let´s not forget about the snow! Almost everyone has a story about what the snow brought into their lives. Some say they love it and while others say it’s hard to drive around with the streets full of snow, but for me it’s a white & happy Christmas for the first time in Canada.

Now getting back to business…. a friend from back home asked me “What exactly do you do at DIVERSEcity?” Well my friend, my role here is very DIVERSE! It starts by checking and answering my emails and drinking some chai tea made by myself or sometimes coffee, (both offered by DIVERSEcity 🙂 ).  If my help is needed, sometimes I help at the front desk. It’s actually fun to answer phone calls. Because I’m new I’m always asking who Maureen Chang is, or who Gurminder is! I will soon learn everyone’s name but it may take time as there are over 100 employees here. When a client does not speak English but only speaks Arabic or another language I always ask Kim and Haneet for help, or I check my list of contacts and ask, perhaps, Rana to come and help translate for me. Working in a multicultural and lingual environment can be challenging but it is important to always be friendly and patient! I’m sometimes have to try to figure out what the clients want by making funny faces or gestures with my hands; I guess I should learn a third language!

dennis1I also love helping with the Community Kitchen Program because I am able to learn new recipes and I also get try the food afterwards. I helped Leo prepare the mashed potatoes once
and they was so good that I served myself twice. But that’s not what it’s all about, it’s about being able to share good moments with clients, learn new skills and help them practice English, and helping them interact and meet new friends. They like the program so much that they even come on a snowy or rainy days. They never miss a day.

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We made salad, garlic bread, mashed potatoes, pork with mushrooms and a strawberry and blueberry smoothie. Yum, I’m hungry now!

dennis3I also recently went to a settlement session for immigrant support workers on employment related topics at the Surrey Sports & Leisure Centre. They talked about some of the services, requirements and benefits available for newcomers, refugees & permanent resident clients. Some of our neighbour organizations were at the event as well, so it was an excellent time to network and to promote the workshop I’m working on.

dennis4I supported Helen with the Food Security, Community Kitchen program. This program provides opportunities for immigrant, refugee and low income families to increase their food security through multicultural cooking groups and community garden activities.

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Irene Yan and I were able to decorate the dining room, wrap the gifts and play some Christmas music. She came up with some fun games to play with the guests.

These are the gifts we gave to our guests, volunteers and clients.

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DIVERSEcity for me is a place where I can really have fun while I help the community. It’s a place to learn how to get along with people from diverse backgrounds and it challenges me to do things I have never done before.

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A friend took a photo of me on my way to DIVERSEcity
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A photo from the Apple Cider Gathering

Apple Cider gathering – This event is an annual tradition at DIVERSEcity. Staff get to enjoy some winter treats. I did not help with this event but I wanted to share the picture to show some of the holiday activities DIVERSEcity had during the month of December. I was able to share a few minutes with the staff, eat some cookies and grapes, and I tasted homemade apple cider for the first time!

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On December 8 we had our department gift exchange activity. I enjoyed it and I was able to learn staff names, take pictures, eat, laugh, have some fun, and tried to guess who gave which gift.

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Everything was so delicious that I wanted the recipe of some of the goodies. I think everyone enjoyed it and the amazing part was that everything was vegetarian!

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I was trying to remember everyone’s name but I knew only 5 or 6 at that point.

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Guess who gave me the gift card and the macaroons? It was Helen Shin, and she even made the macaroons herself!

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“Feeding the Soul: Healthy Mind & Bodies Program” is the new program I am working on! It focuses on refugee and new immigrants/newcomers teens & youths. We will be hosting fun activities, discussing interesting topics, and have guest speakers. I will be sharing a little bit of my experience on how I coped with integrating into Canadian society. We are also going to show the participants how to make easy & healthy snacks in our community kitchen. The first group will start in mid-January 2017 and will be for teens between the ages of 12-15 years old. The second group will be for ages of 15-18 and the third group will be for youth ages 19-24. Right now I’m just getting everything ready.

So I guess that’s what I’ve been doing this month. Reading the policy book, helping out front desk, helping with the Settlement monthly report, going to meetings and seminars, supporting the Settlement team with the English workshop at the Guildford Library, writing for this blog, and helping the Community Kitchen & Moving Ahead Program. It has been busy!

Introducing… DENNIS!

What is your name and role at DIVERSEcity?
Dennis Juarez Flores and my role is Settlement & Community Programs Support Worker.

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?
I was born in a tropical city in Honduras, called San Pedro Sula (known as the industrial city of the country). I always believed that I could do better, that I could help others and that I had a lot of potential to give in whatever field I wanted, but it was very difficult because of the corruption and crime in my country. I always wanted something new, something different and a career and life change. And in fact my life did change, when I decided to come to Vancouver. I came to Canada on April 6th, 2016. I spent almost 3 months preparing myself & preparing paperwork for my hearing and on June 16th the board member approved my claim. After that process, I applied for Permanent Residency, which was approved shortly after they received my application.

I volunteered for almost 3 months at Settlement Orientation Services, and even though a lot of people told me that I shouldn’t waste my time on volunteering, I never stopped, in fact I even doubled my time. My role there was to help newcomers settle in BC by helping them fill out immigration forms and by giving them advice on how to go through the process. Looking for job in BC was very challenging and competitive, until I got training at the YMCA. I learned so much and I was able to share my thoughts, ideas & experiences.

After the program ended, I contacted several organizations and just 2 of them replied back, one of them was DIVERSEcity. After several emails, I got an informal interview and I came here obviously nervous and not knowing what to expect. That same day, my current manager told me if I could start next week. I just couldn’t believe it! I was so happy, excited and thankful that I immediately called my family and told them about it. We were all so happy.

Can you tell me about the programs you support?
At first I started supporting the Community Kitchen Programs, LINC Workshops at Guildford Library and most recently a new program called Feeding the Soul: Healthy Minds & Bodies.

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Can you tell me about the Feeding the Soul: Healthy Mind & Bodies program?
This program targets children & youth in the Surrey area with a particular focus on those that are newcomers, immigrants & refugees. This program will include workshops about how to deal with stress, self-confidence, and self-esteem. We’ll also talk about how to cope with school, society, and new culture. We may have talks from guests as well.

How do you spend most of your work time?
Preparing for the Feeding the Soul workshop is now my main focus. A normal day at DIVERSEcity for me is preparing PowerPoint presentations, searching for videos and pictures for the workshop, looking for fun activities to do and contacting guest speakers. I have also supported the front desk and helped with monthly settlement reports.

What advice do you have for your clients?
I know leaving everything behind is not easy; some of you might have left your family, friends and belongings. I know at first it seems so difficult. Some days are good and others bad, you have to adapt to a new culture, new people, and different weather. Everything seems very challenging; you don’t know how to take the bus or the sky train, there is a different language and trying to integrate into a new society is hard. But guess what? Everything changes! You get used to everything, you start to like the weather, you challenge yourself to make new friends, and you see the kindness in people – people who give you strength & encourage you to continue and to not give up.

Some advice I can give you is to do volunteer work, which will help you get Canadian job experience. You’ll get to know new people & you’ll learn new stuff. The good thing about coming to a new country is that you can start over, have a career change or even change your life.

What do you find most enjoyable about your work?
What I enjoy the most is learning new things and getting to know new people from different backgrounds. I like how diverse the clients and staff are and getting to know new cultures is so amazing; you might even see that you have some similarities in music and food.

What are some of the challenges of the work?
One of the challenges anticipate that I might face is with teenagers from 12-15 years old, because they might be shy to participate. My challenge will be to get them to speak English and to get them to participate without fear in our activities.

What is the best thing about working at DIVERSEcity?
Working at DIVERSEcity for me is so great because I am learning a little bit of everything. I am putting my ideas into action, and being heard by my manager is what makes my job so amazing. It’s good to know that they care about the clients and staff. For me, this is a good opportunity to grow in the settlement field, to gain more experience and perhaps to grow within the organization.

What are your hobbies and interests and how do you de-stress?
My hobbies include watching Netflix, going for walks, going to the beach and just feeling the wind, hanging out with my friends and talking to my loved ones. Whenever I feel stressed, I definitely go to the beach because it makes me feel better. It makes me feel at peace with myself and it reminds me of my country.

What country or city would you like to visit?
I would love to go to Bora Bora, France, and Toronto. I would also like to see the Aurora Borealis in Yukon.

What has been surprising for you over the course of your career?
That everything changes. I always wanted to work for a non-profit organization and I wanted to help people. I studied medicine for almost 5 years in Honduras but coming to Canada I realized that helping people was what I wanted to do. So I started volunteering at a settlement organization and as I write this I realize that 5 years ago I wanted to do what I’m doing now. So at the end you always get what you want.

Has your job affected your lifestyle? Has it changed your outlook on life?
It has changed my life completely. I am more careful with what I say or do, I have more empathy for people, I have always been kind-hearted so now I care more about others, I try to listen carefully to their struggles and see how or what can I do to help them. I always try to help others in any way, because you never know when they will help you back!

If you could get the general public to understand something about refugees and immigrants, what would it be?
I would like people to know why refugees & new immigrants come to Canada. Refugees come to Canada seeking protection, to feel more secure, to forget their past, to start over and to build a brighter future. They face many struggles in their home country; some of them have traumatic experiences that are not easy to overcome: they come from countries that are at war, that discriminated based on religion and sexuality, that do not respect human rights, and engage in torture. So it is good to know what happens in their lives and how we can help them. It is also good that Canada is very welcoming; it is very friendly and very open to new cultures. New immigrants come here to look for a better job, better education and better health care. So if you see someone that is new to Canada, encourage them to never give up, tell them to be strong and to keep fighting for their dreams.

Amy: Surrey Welcomes Refugees

DIVERSEcity had a booth at the Surrey Welcomes Refugees event and it was a success! The event was held on July 20th at the Surrey City Hall Plaza which is surrounded by City Centre Library, City Hall, and Surrey Central Skytrain Station – a very central location.

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Laura, one of my managers, invited me to help prepare for the event and I was delegated the task of preparing activities for our booth. We came up with the idea of playing diversity bingo, having a map where people could put a sticker on where they were from, having an origami station, and a photo station.

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A couple of days before the event I prepared the bingo sheets, made origami samples, and came up with a shopping list.

The day-of was a bit of a whirlwind. On my way to work I stopped by Walmart and Dollarama to pick up candy (~100 pieces – that was a mistake) and some other things we needed. We started packing our supplies about an hour before we were planning to leave and quickly realized how much stuff we had to bring. Turns out we had 2 cars worth of stuff!

It was the perfect day to be outdoors in the plaza: it was sunny, the sky was clear, and it was really warm. Seeing as this was the first time the event was being held, we had no idea of how big of a turnout to expect…

…and we were definitely pleasantly surprised. There were so many people! Tons of kids and families wandering around and mingling, enjoying the food and exploring the booths. Since we had candy and tons of free swag, we were a pretty big hit! I’ve got to say the swag we have is pretty cool. We’re talking mouse pads, pens, bubbles, stress balls, mints and balloons here. So many fun things! We even gave out bags of Lush goodies.

About 45 minutes into the 3 hour event we ran out of candy so we had to get some more. I bought 3 times as much but even then it didn’t last us the rest of the event. Everyone wants candy!

Most of our time was spent mingling with passersby, giving out swag and teaching origami. Because there was so much hustle and bustle at the beginning I wasn’t sure if people would want to actually stop and do origami, but turns out some people were really interested. The bubbles and waterless tattoos were pretty popular too.

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This is Laura! She’s helping this visitor with her tattoo.

It was so much fun interacting with everyone. As we got closer to the end of the event and things settled down, I found the time to go over to a booth offering free henna tattoos. I’ve wanted to get one for ages now and I finally got the chance!

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Look at our henna!

So for reference for the next event: have tons of candy, tons of swag, do the origami (make sure there’s someone there who knows what how to do it!), pass on the bingo, and bring a camera for photos but don’t prepare a photo station.

It was a great evening. I definitely left feeling like Surrey welcomes refugees 🙂